We recently put out a survey to help DuPage County health organizations better understand and respond to residents’ questions and concerns about getting a COVID-19 Vaccine. Click here for the results!

How can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Illinois is currently vaccinating individuals in Groups 1A and 1B. To find out if you qualify, click below. If you are eligible, you may request an appointment to receive your vaccination.

Click below to find your nearest vaccine site.

Do you live OR work in DuPage County? Sign up here to be notified by the county when appointments are available. Vaccination is by appointment only and dependent on vaccine supply. Individuals will be asked to confirm age-based eligibility or employment verification (Employee ID Badge, check stub, state licensure or certificate).

Based on a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccine across the country and in DuPage County, we anticipate it may take approximately 12 weeks to vaccinate the nearly 270,000 individuals in DuPage County who meet Phase 1b criteria. DuPage County has set a goal of vaccinating at least 80% of eligible DuPage residents in 2021.

I want to learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine.

None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19 so a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

The following Q&As come from Project Finish Line’s “Covid Enders Toolkit”:

How was the vaccine made so quickly – doesn’t it usually take longer?

  • COVID-19 is caused by a coronavirus, which is a type of virus. There are other types of coronaviruses, and people were already working on vaccines for other coronaviruses, which gave them a head start.
  • With millions of lives at stake, companies, governments, and universities from every country worked together and used the most advanced technology to quickly develop a vaccine.

Why are there different coronavirus vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, etc.)? Don’t we need just one?

  • Different companies took different approaches to creating the COVID-19 vaccine, which is good because this increased the chance that at least one of the vaccines would end up working.
  • If multiple companies’ make COVID-19 vaccines, this means there will be more vaccines to give to people.

When will the vaccine be available to me?

  • It is expected that the general public will start getting the vaccine by May or June 2021, though this could be around July or August.

How will we know that the vaccine is safe and protects you from COVID-19?

  • Tens of thousands of people volunteered for clinical trials to find out whether the vaccines are safe and effective at protecting people from COVID-19. These trials included racially and ethnically diverse people.
  • Volunteers are followed closely for at least two months after receiving the vaccine to monitor their health before the vaccine can be used for the general public. Any negative reactions to a vaccine would most likely happen within that period. The volunteers are also observed long-term to monitor for any other problems.
  • The results of the trials were reviewed by experts, companies that are making the vaccine, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • Clinical trials began earlier this year, and the vaccine is reported to be about 90% effective.

Will there be any side effects from the vaccine?

  • The most common side effect is soreness where the shot was given, which goes away quickly on its own.
  • Other mild side effects are muscle pain, fever, fatigue, headache, and joint pain. Minor side effects are a sign that your body is starting to build immunity (protection) against a disease. Severe side effects are rare.

Why is fever a side effect of the vaccine, does that mean I am getting COVID-19?

  • Mild fever is a common side effect of many vaccinations, like the flu vaccine. It does not mean you will have COVID-19.
  • A mild fever can be part of your body’s training to fight off COVID-19.

How much will the vaccine cost?

  • The government has promised the vaccine will be provided to people in the United States for free. Providers giving the vaccine can charge an administration fee, but these fees can be reimbursed by the patient’s insurance or Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) if they do not have insurance.

I really don’t trust the vaccine, what can I do instead?

  • If you don’t trust the vaccine right away, it is understandable. To protect yourself, wear a mask, maintain social distance from those you don’t live with, and wash your hands often!

Do you have other, unanswered COVID-19 vaccine related questions? Or do you need help registering for the COVID-19 vaccine?
The DuPage County Health Department has set up a hotline to answer any and all of your COVID-19 vaccine related questions. Please call them at (630) 682-7400 and a representative will assist you. More details on their hotline in the link below.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a comprehensive website on COVID-19 vaccine safety, distribution, etc.

Racial Equity and the COVID-19 Vaccine

Black and brown communities are being disproportionally affected by COVID-19, with higher rates of infection and poorer health outcomes than their white peers. Since vaccine hesitancy could further these health disparities, it is important to understand why some people may be reluctant to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. We are working closely with community partners to serve these marginalized communities and promote vaccine confidence. We are also working to help the patients we serve get vaccinations if they qualify.  

Here are some recent community events promoting vaccine confidence:
WBEZ Latino Communities and the COVID-19 Vaccines
Making it Plain; What Black American Needs to Know About COVID-19 and Vaccine
Midwest Asian Health Association Covid-19 Vaccine Townhall

Illinois COVID-19 Vaccination Data

Current vaccination availability and plans are fluid. Click the buttons below to learn what’s happening now: